US - INDIA GLOBAL REVIEW

43 US-INDIA GLOBAL REVIEW JULY-SEPTEMBER 2018 demand for international probes into alleged human rights viola- tions in Kashmir. It’s given an elat- ed Pakistan upper hand in attack- ing India at international forums. Pakistan lost no time in asking for a probe in Kashmir. The report by the Office of the High Commissioner of Human Rights – the first of its kind – “called on Indian security forces to exercise maximum restraint, and strictly abide by international stan- dards governing the use of force when dealing with future protests, including ones that could well occur this coming weekend,” adding, “it is essential the Indian authorities take immediate and effective steps to avoid a repeti- tion of the numerous examples of excessive use of force by security forces in Kashmir.” Reports in Indian newspapers said India got a rude shock, were caught off-guard by the partisan report, which is light in its criticism of Pakistan. India’s Ministry of External Affairs described the report as “fallacious, tendentious and moti- vated”, said it was violating Indian sovereignty and “a selective com- pilation of largely unverified infor- mation … overtly prejudiced and seeks to build a false narrative.” In the recent past, India had relentlessly slammed Pakistan at the UN. This report, however, cre- ates a new international headache, of having to explain, defend military action in Kashmir, to countries who, unwittingly or not, demand a probe. Such coun- tries may try to leverage diplomat- ic and economic concessions from India, in either asking for a probe, or not to. American historian Stephen Kotkin, a professor in history and international affairs at Princeton University and a fellow at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution, writing in Foreign Affairs this week, points out that conflicts and dynamics between leading nations is inevitable. He doesn’t talk of India, but focuses his attention to dynamics between US and China. “Great-power politics will drive events, and international rivalries will be decided by the relative capacities of the competitors— their material and human capital and their ability to govern them- selves and their foreign affairs effectively,” he writes, adding, “… the course of the coming century will largely be determined by how China and the United States man- age their power resources and their relationship.” India’s job is cut out for them: it’s not just the US they have to deal with. They have to be on their guard against the rest of the world too. This article first appeared in www.newsindiatimes.com June 14. Sujeet Rajan is Executive Editor | Parikh Worldwide Media, based in New York. Email him: sujeet@newsindiatimes.com In the recent past, India had relentlessly slammed Pakistan at the UN. This report, however, creates a new international headache, of having to explain, defend mili- tary action in Kashmir, to countries who, unwittingly or not, demand a probe.

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